NHL Rookie - Lesson 03 - Scoring Tips and Strategy

How to Play DFH

Scoring

Skaters

  • Goal = +3 PTS
  • Assist = +2 PTS
  • Shot on Goal = +0.5 PTS
  • Blocked Shot = +0.5 PTS
  • Short Handed Point Bonus (Goal/Assist) = +1 PTS
  • Shootout Goal = +0.2 PTS
  • Hat Trick Bonus = +1.5 PTS

Goalies

  • Win = +3 PTS
  • Save = +0.2 PTS
  • Goal Against = -1 PTS
  • Shutout Bonus = +2 PTS
  • Goalies WILL receive points for all stats they accrue, including goals and assists.
  • The Goalie Shutout Bonus is credited to goalies if they complete the entire game with 0 goals allowed in regulation + overtime. Shootout goals will not prevent a shutout. Goalie must complete the entire game to get credit for a shutout.

Lineup Building

  • When looking for good mid-level and value plays for your lineup, sort the players by their FPTS average for the season. You will find solid players at more affordable prices higher on that list than you might think, and it will help you from having to scroll through looking for specific names.
  • Use the tabs on the player cards. Clicking on the player name and bringing up a player card provides a wealth of information. It gives you a breakdown of a player’s last game, their last 10 games and their season overall.
  • You can also use the tabs on the player cards to check split stats. You can see how a player performs at home and on the road, and how that player has done against the team they are playing that day. If a player has 40 points on the season, and 35 have come at home, that player is probably not a good option if he has a road matchup.
  • And finally, be sure to research the matchups. Look into the players and look into their team. If the team is last place in the league and is allowing the most goals per game in the league, chances are you want to avoid their defense and goaltending. Conversely, if a team is the highest-scoring in the league, you’ll want to consider players from that team.


Line Stacking

Line stacking is just what it sounds like- you are stacking your lineup with players who are on the same team and line and are seeing consistent time together. Players will look to target at least two, if not all three, members of a particular line and get those players into their lineup. It does not necessarily have to be a top line, as there are high-level, mid-level and value-level line stacks out there.

A tool for you to use on DraftKings to help with line stacking is the “Depth Charts.” It is a great tool to look at when you are deciding on line stacks, as it will give you an up-to-date look at what players are skating on certain lines and pairings. It does not give you power play (PP) stacks, but it will allow you to see where players are playing in a team’s lineup.

If you know that a team has a highly successful PP unit then you could target a number of players from that PP line and stack them for your roster, even if they do not play together consistently at even strength. And line stacking is not limited to forwards. If you have a high-level forward and defenseman who have combined for points in a number of games, then consider them in your lineup together, especially if they have the added bonus of being on the same PP unit. Stacking forwards who see even strength and PP time together with a defenseman on that team who regularly plays with them at even strength and on the PP is a common strategy.

 


I am a promoter at DraftKings and am also an avid fan and user (my username is HardingJ2) and may sometimes play on my personal account in the games that I offer advice on. Although I have expressed my personal view on the games and strategies above, they do not necessarily reflect the view(s) of DraftKings and I may also deploy different players and strategies than what I recommend above.