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The 2019 NBA Draft is complete and here’s some analysis for each pick from our team of writers.


1. New Orleans Pelicans: Zion Williamson, F, Duke

A surprise to no one, Zion effectively became a Pelican when New Orleans won the top pick in the Draft Lottery. One of the best prospects in draft history, Williamson’s highlights set the social media world on fire during the college basketball season. He has an unheard of combination of size and speed and should be a factor on both ends of the court from Opening Night. At -167, he’s the current favorite to win Rookie of the Year honors. At Duke, Zion averaged 22.6 points and 8.9 rebounds on 68% shooting from the field. The only slight knock on Williamson is an inconsistent shot, but he made 33.8% from three as a freshman.
— Greg Ehrenberg, DK Live contributor


2. Memphis Grizzlies: Ja Morant, PG, Murray State

Morant is a 6’3″ point guard from Murray State who has earned comparisons to Russell Westbrook due to his explosiveness, speed and ability to drive past defenders. Morant has long arms for his size, posting a 6’7″ wingspan, which helps him get his shot off easier and helps defensively. In terms of his fantasy value for 2019-20, the Grizzlies just traded Mike Conley Jr. to the Jazz, opening up a spot at starting PG for Morant to slide into. The downside is that the Grizzlies play a slow pace, which generally creates less opportunities for fantasy scoring. Memphis played just 97 possessions per 48 minutes last season, the slowest pace in the league.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


3. New York Knicks: RJ Barrett, F, Duke

Ever since the departure of Carmelo Anthony, New York has searched for a star to carry its team. Free agency has been fruitless and the Knicks haven’t had much luck in the Draft Lottery, but the tides could turn with the addition of Barrett. As a freshman at Duke, he averaged 22.6 points, 4.3 assists and 7.6 rebounds. The counting stats are nice, although they do come with red flags. Barrett struggled to finish at the rim in the half court and he posted poor shooting efficiency numbers. He shot 30.8% from three, 66.5% from the line and averaged 3.2 turnovers per game. The Duke offense tanked with Zion Williamson off the court, but there is a belief that Barrett could up his efficiency playing with better floor spacing in the NBA.
— Greg Ehrenberg, DK Live contributor


4. Atlanta Hawks (via NOP via LAL): De’Andre Hunter, F, UVA

The Lakers originally owned this pick, which they traded to the Pelicans as part of the Anthony Davis trade before New Orleans moved the pick to the Hawks earlier in the evening. Hunter is one of the best defensive players in the draft with good length at wing, standing 6’7″ with a 7’2″ wingspan. Hunter is a candidate to be able to switch onto multiple positions, making him an ideal defender in today’s NBA. He has a chance to develop into a strong “3 and D” wing, as he showcased an excellent outside shot at Virginia, shooting 44% from 3-point range. Hunter lands in a good fantasy spot in Atlanta, who played the fastest pace in the league last season, which generally increases possessions for fantasy scoring.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


5. Cleveland Cavaliers: Darius Garland, PG, Vanderbilt

After the Pelicans traded the No. 4 overall pick to the Hawks, the Cavs were involved in trade discussions involving the No. 5 pick, but in the end they used it to select Garland. He’s a little bit of a mystery, entering the draft after only playing five games as a freshman at Vanderbilt, but his game translates very well to the NBA. Garland has great handle, good size and is a spectacular shooter with deep range. There will be some questions about how he’ll fit alongside last year’s first-round pick, Collin Sexton, but Cleveland simply went with the best player available here. Assuming he’s healthy, he should play significant minutes for the Cavs as a rookie.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


6. Minnesota Timberwolves (via PHX): Jarrett Culver, G/F, Texas Tech

The pick originally belonged to the Suns, who traded the pick to the Timberwolves earlier in the evening for Dario Saric and the 11th overall pick. Culver is a large SG from Texas Tech, standing 6’7″ with a 6’10” wingspan, which helps him play strong defense. Switchable wings are coveted in today’s NBA, which makes Culver a good defensive fit for the modern game. Culver is able to play on the ball and create offense for himself or others, and has potential to develop into a strong two-way guard. Culver’s weaknesses include struggling with his outside shot, as he shot just 30% from 3-point range last season with Texas Tech.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


7. Chicago Bulls: Coby White, PG, UNC

Even with Kris Dunn on the roster, the Bulls had a glaring hole at point guard last season. White has good size at 6’5″, and should be a good fit in the backcourt with Zach LaVine. White averaged 16.1 points, 3.5 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.1 steals in 28.5 minutes per game as a freshman at North Carolina. He was forced into a larger role than expected, and proved himself as a scorer that can push the pace. The Bulls continue to add valuable pieces to their young core, and should look to involve White early on as a rookie.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


8. New Orleans Pelicans (via ATL): Jaxson Hayes, C, Texas

The pick originally belonged to the Hawks, who traded it to the Pelicans to move up to draft De’Andre Hunter at No. 4. Hayes is the Pelicans’ second pick of the night after taking Zion Williamson first overall. Hayes, a 7’0″ center from Texas with a 7’3″ wingspan, will give New Orleans an athletic frontcourt paired next to Williamson. Hayes was an incredibly efficient scorer in college, ranking in the 100th percentile by scoring 1.3 points per possession, per Synergy. Hayes was also incredibly efficient at finishing at the rim in the halfcourt, ranking in the 98th percentile in points per shot at the rim in the halfcourt, per Synergy.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


9. Washington Wizards: Rui Hachimura, PF, Gonzaga

Hachimura was a late bloomer as a junior at Gonzaga, but as he learned the culture and the game, his potential became obvious. Hachimura averaged 19.7 points and 6.5 boards last season, but was extremely efficient — shooting 59.1% from the field and 41.7% from downtown. He should be able to slot in at either forward position for the Wizards, and has upside to be a very solid scorer next to Bradley Beal. With John Wall still sidelined, Washington needs the scoring boost.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


10. Atlanta Hawks (via DAL): Cam Reddish, F, Duke

Reddish was the third Duke player to be selected in the top 10, following Zion Williamson (Pelicans, No. 1) and R.J. Barrett (Knicks, No. 3), and it was Atlanta’s second pick in the top 10 after taking De’Andre Hunter fourth overall. Reddish has big size at wing, standing 6’8″ with a 7’1″ wingspan. Reddish is considered to have big upside, and joins a very young Hawks core that features Trae Young, Kevin Huerter, John Collins and Hunter, all whom are 21 years old or younger. Reddish lands in a good fantasy spot with the Hawks, as Atlanta played the fastest pace in the league last season, which helps increase opportunities for fantasy scoring.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


11. Phoenix Suns (via MIN): Cameron Johnson, F, UNC

This one’s our first head-scratcher of the night. Not only was Johnson expected to go well outside of the lottery, but the Suns initially were rumored to be in the hunt for a point guard at No. 6 overall, but then traded back with the Timberwolves, and used No. 11 on a 6’9″ forward. Johnson had solid numbers at UNC, averaging 16.9 points, 5.8 rebounds and 2.4 assists, but was a fifth-year senior that took a lot of time to develop. Johnson does have a good shooting stroke, shooting 45.7% from downtown last season, but the Suns may regret passing on some younger talent that also have shooting ability. That said, Johnson should play right away, and brings some fantasy value.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


12. Charlotte Hornets: P.J. Washington Jr., PF, Kentucky

Washington, a 6’8″ PF who has a 7’3″ wingspan, was an efficient scorer for Kentucky, ranking in the 86th percentile by scoring 1.025 points per possession, per Synergy. Washington also had a good outside shot in college, making 42% of his 3-point attempts. He was also good in the catch-and-shoot role, ranking in the 93rd percentile in catch-and-shoot jump shots in the half court, per Synergy. His weaknesses include free-throw shooting, as he shot just 66% from the line last season in college, below the NBA league average of 77%. Washington will compete for playing time at PF in Charlotte with incumbent starter Marvin Williams, who was below average by PER (12.6) last season.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


13. Miami Heat: Tyler Herro, SG, Kentucky

The Heat lost a shooting guard in Dwyane Wade this offseason, and will add to the position through the draft. Herro’s strength is obvious — he’s a lights out shooter. While he shot 35.5% from three as a freshman at Kentucky, he showed elite range and tough shot making ability. His stroke is best highlighted by his free throw percentage, which was 93.5% last season. Herro’s a pretty well-rounded player, averaging 14.0 points, 4.5 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.1 steals in his lone season with the Wildcats. His shooting ability is clearly at a premium in the NBA right now, which should keep him around the league for a while.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


14. Boston Celtics (via SAC via PHI): Romeo Langford, SG, Indiana

The Celtics continue to stockpile lengthy young wings, as the 6’6″ Langford has a large wingspan at 6’11”, the type of length that gives him upside defensively. Langford joins a young wing unit of Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown, all who have wingspans of at least 6’11”, which helps them switch onto multiple positions defensively. Langford was excellent at preventing points guarding in isolated in college, ranking in the 93rd percentile in points allowed per possession in isolation, per Synergy. Offensively, he is considered to be a talented scorer who can create his own shot, but struggled with his outside shot at Indiana, shooting just 27% from 3-point range.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


15. Detroit Pistons: Sekou Doumbouya, PF, France

Doumbouya was one of the mysteries entering this draft, but had some hype to be selected in the top 10. The 19-year-old showed flashes while playing limited minutes professionally in France last season, but the Pistons might have to show some patience in developing him.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


16. Orlando Magic: Chuma Okeke, PF, Auburn

Okeke tore his ACL in the NCAA tournament at the end of March, so he will begin the season on the sideline for the Magic. Okeke was excellent in the post, ranking in the 92nd percentile in points per post up possession, per Synergy. Okeke also has the skills to develop into a strong defender.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


17. New Orleans Pelicans (via ATL via BKN): Nickeil Alexander-Walker, SG, Virginia Tech

Alexander-Walker had a solid sophomore season for Virginia Tech, slightly improving in almost every statistical category. His NBA comparison is his cousin, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, who was a lottery pick by the Clippers last season. Alexander-Walker becomes another addition for the Pelicans that stems from the Anthony Davis trade.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


18. Indiana Pacers: Goga Bitadze, C, Georgia

Bitadze is a 6’11” center from the EuroLeague who is a candidate to fit the modern NBA well, as he has potential to space the floor, shooting 40% from 3-point range last season. Bitadze was a very efficient scorer, ranking in the 93rd percentile in scoring efficiency while showcasing strong performance around the rim, ranking in the 92nd percentile in points per shot attempt at the rim in the half court, per Synergy.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


19. San Antonio Spurs: Luka Samanic, PF, Croatia

Samanic wasn’t well known entering this draft, but has been linked to the Spurs throughout the process. San Antonio is known for it’s international scouting, and is reaching a little bit to get their hands on the Croatian combo-forward. Samanic is a tremendous offensive player, but has a lot of developing to do, both in terms of his game and physique.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


20. Philadelphia 76ers (via BOS via LAC via MEM): Mattise Thybulle, SF, Washington

Boston selected Thybulle with the 20th overall pick before shipping him to Philadelphia, per reports. While Thybulle’s offensive game needs some work, he is one of the best defensive players in the 2019 draft and was named the Naismith Defensive Player of the Year last season. Thybulle is a 6’5″ wing who has a big wingspan at 7’0″, which helps him be a disruptive force on the perimeter. Philadelphia has a big offseason in front of them with Jimmy Butler, JJ Redick and Tobias Harris all set to become free agents, so it’s too early to tell who will be ahead of Thybulle on the Sixers’ depth chart.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


21. Memphis Grizzlies (via OKC): Brandon Clarke, F, Gonzaga

The Thunder will move back just two spots to No. 23 overall, and will gain a 2024 second-rounder to do so. Memphis will add a really strong prospect in Clarke, who is an extremely well-rounded 6’8″ forward that can do almost everything on the floor. Clarke averaged 16.9 points, 8.6 boards, 1.9 assists, 1.2 steals and 3.2 blocks during his junior year at Gonzaga, shooting 68.7% from the field in the process. He makes for a nice fit next to Jaren Jackson Jr. in the frontcourt.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


22. Boston Celtics: Grant Williams, PF, Tennessee

Williams, a 6’7″ PF from Tennessee, was one of the most efficient scorers in college last season, ranking in the 97th percentile in points per possession, per Synergy. He did a ton of his damage in the post, ranking in the 97th percentile in post up pointer per possession, and was excellent at drawing free throws there. Williams is not big for his position, but is still considered to be a capable defender.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


23. Oklahoma City Thunder (via MEM via UTA): Darius Bazley, SF, Princeton HS (Ohio)

After trading back two spots to No. 23 overall, the Thunder wind up with Bazley, who originally committed to Syracuse. Bazley decided to pass on college to play in the G-League, which also didn’t pan out for him. After essentially taking the year to train for the NBA, he impressed teams enough in his workouts to remain a first-round pick.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


24. Phoenix Suns (via BOS via PHI): Ty Jerome, SG, UVA

Jerome is tall for a G, standing at 6’5″, and graded remarkably well off the ball, ranking in the 97th percentile in catch-and-shoot scoring efficiency, per Synergy. Jerome enters a Phoenix backcourt that may have both Tyler Johnson and Devin Booker as ball-handlers, although Johnson has a player option for 2019-20 and his name has surfaced in trade rumors. If Johnson does not pick up his player option or is traded, Jerome is a candidate to start right away at PG.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


25. Portland Trail Blazers: Nassir Little, SF, UNC

The Blazers get one of the steals of the draft in Little at No. 25 overall. Little was considered a top-5 prospect entering his freshman season at UNC, and had the potential to be a top-10 pick in this draft. Most mock drafts had Little going in the late stages of the lottery, so his slide was extremely surprising. Little didn’t put up big numbers in his lone season at UNC, but played extremely limited minutes behind a veteran frontcourt. Portland has to be pleased getting such a high-upside prospect this late in the draft.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


26. Cleveland Cavaliers (via HOU): Dylan Windler, SG, Belmont

Windler, a 6’8″ wing with a 6’10” wingspan, is an excellent shooter and was one of the most efficient college players in the country, ranking in the 99th percentile in scoring efficiency, the 94th percentile in catch-and-shoot possessions and in the 85th percentile in pull-up shooting, per Synergy. He is a candidate to see significant playing time for a rebuilding Cavaliers team that will focus on developing their young players.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


27. Los Angeles Clippers (via BKN via DEN): Mfiondu Kabengele, PF, Florida State

The Clippers traded up for the No. 27 pick, sending the Nets the No. 56 pick in the draft, along with a 2020 first-round pick from the 76ers, per ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski. Los Angeles used No. 27 to select Kabengele, a 6’10” sophomore from FSU. Kabengele averaged 13.2 points, 5.9 boards and 1.5 blocks in just 21.6 minutes per game, while shooting 50% from the field and 37% from downtown. Meanwhile, the Nets continue to clear cap space for their push in free agency.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


28. Golden State Warriors: Jordan Poole, G/F, Michigan

The Warriors’ lack of shooting depth was on display in the NBA Finals, and Poole will be a cheap source of shooting for a team that may pay a gigantic luxury tax bill depending on how free agency goes. Poole was excellent in the spot up role at Michigan, ranking in the 92nd percentile in spot up scoring efficiency, per Synergy. He has good size for a SG, standing at 6’6″.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


29. San Antonio Spurs (via TOR): Keldon Johnson, SF, Kentucky

Johnson had the potential to go just outside of the lottery, but fell to the Spurs at the end of the first round at No. 29 overall. Johnson’s extremely aggressive getting to the rim, and is a solid free throw shooter at just above 70%. He posted averages of 13.5 points, 5.9 rebounds and 1.6 assists during his freshman season at Kentucky.
— Julian Edlow, DK Live contributor


30. Cleveland Cavaliers (via DET via MIL): Kevin Porter Jr., SG, USC

The Cavs traded four second-round picks and cash to trade up to pick No. 30 for Porter, per reports. Porter was Cleveland’s third first-round pick of the 2019 draft, joining PG Darius Garland and wing Dylan Windler. Porter is a good-sized wing at 6’6″ with a nice 6’9″ wingspan and is considered to have significant potential defensively. Offensively, he was best in transition, ranking in the 89th percentile in transition scoring efficiency, per Synergy.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


DRAFT DAY TRADE TRACKER

5:30 p.m. ET: The Pacers acquired SF/PF T.J. Warren and the No. 32 pick from the Suns, per ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski.

Analysis: Warren appeared to be a desired commodity in the trade market although he didn’t fetch much of a return, per Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN. Phoenix had to send the 32nd pick in the 2019 NBA Draft to Indiana to get off the three years and $35M left on Warren’s contract. With the move, the Suns open up more cap space, although it’s hard to believe free agents are making it a priority to sign in Phoenix. Warren missed nearly half of last season struggling with ankle soreness, although offseason surgery was not required. When healthy, he made big improvements on his perimeter game. Warren shot 42.8% from three on 4.2 attempts per game and figures to help spread the court for Indy.
— Greg Ehrenberg, DK Live contributor


6:01 p.m. ET: The Hawks acquired the No. 4 pick, SF/PF Solomon Hill, the No. 57 pick and a future second-round pick from the Pelicans for picks Nos. 8, 17 and 35, per Woj.

Analysis: In addition to the fourth overall pick, the Pelicans are sending Solomon Hill, the No. 57 pick, and a future second-round pick to the Hawks for picks Nos. 8, 17, and 35 in 2019 and a heavily protected 2020 first-round pick from Cleveland, per ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski. The move gets New Orleans off Hill’s awful contract, which will free up about $12.3 million that they can use either in free agency or in trades. With the fourth pick, the Hawks are targeting Virginia F DeAndre Hunter, per Wojnarowski. Hunter is a 6’7″ wing who is one of the best defensive players in the draft and can shoot from the outside, making him an ideal wing to play in today’s NBA.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


6:20 p.m. ET: The T-Wolves acquired the No. 6 pick from the Suns for PF Dario Saric and the No. 11 pick, per Woj.

Analysis: Minnesota has traded the 11th overall pick and Dario Saric to Phoenix to move up to sixth, per ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski. Minnesota had previously tried to trade up to fourth overall, so it’s clear that the Timberwolves like a player in the top six, although word has not yet leaked about who they are specifically targeting. For Phoenix, Saric gives the Suns a floor-spacing big to pair next to Deandre Ayton in the frontcourt. Saric has shot a plus 38% from 3-point range over his last two seasons, which excludes his rookie season, where he struggled from deep.
— Timothy Finnegan, DK Live contributor


9:39 p.m. ET: The 76ers acquired the rights to SF Mattise Thybulle (No. 20) from the Celtics for picks Nos. 24 and 33, per Woj.


9:42 p.m. ET: The Grizzlies moved up to the No. 21 pick from No. 23 with the Thunder, per The Athletic’s Shams Charania.


10:20 p.m. ET: The Celtics have traded C Aron Baynes and the rights to SG Ty Jerome to the Suns for a 2020 first-round pick, per Woj.


10:47 p.m. ET: The Wizards have acquired SG/SF Jonathon Simmons and the No. 42 pick from the 76ers, per Shams.


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I am a promoter at DraftKings and am also an avid fan and user (my username is jedlow) and may sometimes play on my personal account in the games that I offer advice on. Although I have expressed my personal view on the games and strategies above, they do not necessarily reflect the view(s) of DraftKings and I may also deploy different players and strategies than what I recommend above. I am not an employee of DraftKings and do not have access to any non-public information.


I am a promoter at DraftKings and am also an avid fan and user (my username is timfinn521) and may sometimes play on my personal account in the games that I offer advice on. Although I have expressed my personal view on the games and strategies above, they do not necessarily reflect the view(s) of DraftKings and I may also deploy different players and strategies than what I recommend above. I am not an employee of DraftKings and do not have access to any non-public information.


I am a promoter at DraftKings and am also an avid fan and user (my username is gehrenberg) and may sometimes play on my personal account in the games that I offer advice on. Although I have expressed my personal view on the games and strategies above, they do not necessarily reflect the view(s) of DraftKings and I may also deploy different players and strategies than what I recommend above. I am not an employee of DraftKings and do not have access to any non-public information.